Privacy Online News on creepy ass Google Chrome secretly installing audio listening software and transmitting audio data back to Google:

This was supposedly to enable the “Ok, Google” behavior – that when you say certain words, a search function is activated. Certainly a useful feature. Certainly something that enables eavesdropping of every conversation in the entire room, too.

Obviously, your own computer isn’t the one to analyze the actual search command. Google’s servers do. Which means that your computer had been stealth configured to send what was being said in your room to somebody else, to a private company in another country, without your consent or knowledge, an audio transmission triggered by… an unknown and unverifiable set of conditions.

Google had two responses to this. The first was to introduce a practically-undocumented switch to opt out of this behavior, which is not a fix: the default install will still wiretap your room without your consent, unless you opt out, and more importantly, know that you need to opt out, which is nowhere a reasonable requirement. But the second was more of an official statement following technical discussions on Hacker News and other places.

It seems like almost weekly we read a new story about how much creepier and more invasive Google is becoming, for the noble goal of helping us get the results we need so we can work smarter, quicker, and easier.

The question remaining is this: is this privacy invasion trade-off worthwhile in the longrun?