In a move that surprised nobody except the company behind the beleagured product, Facebook’s new security chief has publicly called for Adobe to essentially euthanize Flash to eradicate all the security baggage associated with it:

In a tweet this weekend, Stamos – who is a respected member of the security community who is credited for improving the security stance of Yahoo at his previous job – said that it was time for Adobe to announce when Flash would be killed off, and for browsers to assist by dropping support at the same time.

In a follow-up tweet, Stamos said that Adobe’s death date didn’t have to be today or tomorrow – but a date had to be set in stone for systems to be made more secure.

If Adobe Flash is ever going to be kicked to the kerb (as it seems it should be) then a date clearly needs to be declared to drive the push to a Flash-free world. It’s not just important for browsers, of course, but also for companies whose websites and in-house applications might rely heavily on the technology.

The problem is that perhaps Adobe doesn’t feel happy acknowledging that securing Flash is beyond them, and so is unwilling to drop the product. The truth is that the company would probably gain a lot more respect from the internet community if it worked towards this ultimate fix for the Flash problem, rather than clinging on to the belief that it might be able to one day make Flash secure.

I doubt many people will disagree. With mobile being the primary vehicle to the internet these days, Flash’s relevance continues to decline and will ultimately fade out anyways. It will be smarter for Adobe to do it earlier rather than sooner.