As a result of the recent OPM breach, the CIA is considering preventing a large number of its American spies from working overseas ever again because of the potential danger they face (emphasis added):

The C.I.A. and other agencies with undercover officers would be cautious about immediately withdrawing spies from China because that would raise suspicions among Chinese counterintelligence operatives. A C.I.A. spokesman declined to comment.

The C.I.A. and other agencies typically post their spies in American embassies, where the officers pose as diplomats working on political affairs, agricultural policy or other issues. The American Embassy in Beijing has long housed one of the largest C.I.A. stations in the world, with intelligence officers gathering information on China’s political maneuvering, economic development and military modernization.

Several current and former officials said that even if the identities of the agency officers were not in the personnel office’s database, Chinese intelligence operatives could run searches through the database on everyone granted visas to work at American diplomatic outposts in China. If any of the names are not found in the stolen files, those individuals could be suspected as spies by a process of elimination.

The director of the National Security Agency, Adm. Michael S. Rogers, alluded to that problem Thursday night during an interview at the Aspen Security Forum in Colorado.

“From an intelligence perspective, it gives you great insight potentially used for counterintelligence purposes,” Admiral Rogers said. “If I’m interested in trying to identify U.S. persons who may be in my country — and I am trying to figure out why they are there: Are they just tourists? Are they there for some other alternative purpose? — there are interesting insights from the data you take from O.P.M.”

As I keep saying, the OPM breach is one of the worst in the history of the US government and will have unintended consequences for years to come.