The Department of Justice continues to proclaim the sky is falling on encryption and is now calling for a balance to include law enforcement needs even though technical experts keep saying it just is not possible (emphasis added):

Beginning in late 2014, FBI and DOJ officials have sounded alarms about encryption, saying law enforcement agencies are increasingly “going dark” in criminal and terrorism investigations because subjects’ data unavailable, even after a court-issued warrant. Apple and Google both announced new end-to-end encryption services on their mobile operating systems, in part as a response to leaks about massive surveillance programs at the National Security Agency.

One recent criminal defendant described end-to-end encryption as “another gift from God,” Deputy Attorney General Sally Quillian Yates said during a speech last month. “But we all know this is no gift—it is a risk to public safety,” she said then.

Several encryption and security experts, as well as digital rights groups, have criticized the DOJ and FBI calls for encryption workarounds. “If it’s easier for the FBI to break in, then it’s easier for Chinese hackers to break in,” Senator Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, said last month. “It’s not possible to give the FBI special access to Americans’ technology without making security weaker for everyone.”