The New York Times reports on some new details about the recent cyber attack targeting the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics 2018 opening ceremony:

The cyberattack took out internet access and telecasts, grounded broadcasters’ drones, shut down the Pyeongchang 2018 website, and prevented spectators from printing out reservations and attending the ceremony, which resulted in an unusually high number of empty seats.

Security experts said they had uncovered evidence that the attack had been in the works since late last year. It was directed at the Pyeongchang Organizing Committee and incorporated code that was specifically designed to disrupt the Games or perhaps even send a political message.

“This attacker had no intention of leaving the machine usable,” a team of researchers at Cisco’s Talos threat intelligence division wrote in an analysis Monday. “The purpose of this malware is to perform destruction of the host” and “leave the computer system offline.”

The attackers included the ability to basically destroy the endpoints but opted not to wield the capability. This is quite interesting, and really speaks to the attackers motivation. It really smells like a political message being delivered to either Pyeongchang or the International Olympic Committee, most likely the latter more than the former.

So the question is: who has the motivation to want to disrupt the Olympics, and why target the IOC? Could it be Russia in retaliation for the doping allegations over the past few years?

Security companies would not say definitively who was behind the attack, but some digital crumbs led to a familiar culprit: Fancy Bear, the Russian hacking group with ties to Russian intelligence services. Fancy Bear was determined to be the more brazen of the two Russian hacking groups behind an attack on the Democratic National Committee ahead of the 2016 presidential election.

Beginning in November, CrowdStrike’s intelligence team witnessed Fancy Bear attacks that stole credentials from an international sports organization, Mr. Meyers said. He declined to identify the victim but suggested that the credential thefts were similar to the ones that hackers would have needed before their opening ceremony attack.

On Wednesday, two days before the ceremony, the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs made an apparent attempt to pre-empt any accusations of Russian cyberattacks on the Games. In a statement, released in English, German and Russian, the agency accused Western governments, press and information security companies of waging an “information war” accusing Russia of “alleged cyber interference” and “planning to attack the ideals of the Olympic movement.”

Ding ding ding, we have a winner. Who, other than Russia, has the motivation and capacity for such an attack?