Dark Reading tracking bitcoin wallet addresses as indicators of compromise (IOCs) as a valuable defense data point:

By tracking bitcoin wallet addresses as an IOC, we’ve been able to connect the dots between ransomware, wallet addresses, and shared infrastructure, TTPs (tactics, techniques, and procedures), and attribution.

Here is an example of how bitcoin is used in a ransomware campaign: A new piece of ransomware gives you a bitcoin address for payment. You can then make correlations that connect across sectors, like retail, energy, or technology groups based on the blockchain and/or reuse of the same address. With WannaCry, there were hard-coded bitcoin addresses that made it easy to correlate what you are dealing with and which sectors were being affected. The more bitcoin addresses are shared, the more you can identify addresses to which bitcoins are forwarded.

The ability to track transactions through the blockchain allows you to connect different ransomware campaigns. Cybercriminals don’t typically share bitcoin wallets as they might share the same exploit kit, but by tracking blockchain transactions, analysts have another investigation point from which they can pivot and dig for more.

I doubt there are many organizations using this technique. It is both valuable, and forward-thinking, and should be considered based on an organization’s cyber defense capabilities maturity level. If threat intelligence is already being consumed, adding this should be fairly straight-forward.