The Seattle Times is reporting a Boeing manufacturing plant was hit with the ostensibly North Korean developed WannaCry ransomware even though the malware was unleashed over a year ago, and a patch has been available from Microsoft since March 2017:

Mike VanderWel, chief engineer at Boeing Commercial Airplane production engineering, sent out an alarming alert about the virus calling for “All hands on deck.”

“It is metastasizing rapidly out of North Charleston and I just heard 777 (automated spar assembly tools) may have gone down,” VanderWel wrote, adding his concern that the virus could hit equipment used in functional tests of airplanes ready to roll out and potentially “spread to airplane software.”

VanderWel’s message said the attack required “a batterylike response,” a reference to the 787 in-flight battery fires in 2013 that grounded the world’s fleet of Dreamliners and led to an extraordinary three-month-long engineering effort to find a fix.

So an assembly plant was affected, but no word on how the WannaCry ransomware penetrated the operational network. This vital piece of information is necessary to better comprehend exactly what happened, why it happened, and how to prevent future similar breaches.