ZDNet discusses how Iranian hackers are breaching Singapore universities to access research data:

At least 52 accounts were affected across the Nanyang Technological University (NTU), National University of Singapore (NUS), Singapore Management University, and Singapore University of Technology and Design, according to a joint statement Tuesday by Cyber Security Agency of Singapore (CSA) and Ministry of Education (MOE).

Hackers had used phishing attacks to harvest credentials from affected staff members and used these to gain access to the institutes’ online libraries and research articles published by the academic staff.

Based on their investigations, CSA and MOE said no sensitive data had been stolen and the attacks did not appear to be linked to the APT attacks against NUS and NTU last year.

They were, however, believed to be part of last month’s attacks against education institutions worldwide including 144 universities in the US, after which the US Deputy Attorney General unveiled a series of indictments and financial sanctions against Iranians. The US government had identified nine Iranians thought to be part of the cyberattacks.

Iran is stepping up their cyber attack profile, hitting more locations outside their immediate vicinity. It is interesting to witness Iran maturing from a strong localized actor to a more globalized one. Likely the success of Chinese, Russian, and North Korean nation state backed actors is likely motivation enough for Iran, who wants to be recognized as a world cyber power.

In addition, Iran is well behind the rest of the globe in research. Much like how China primarily leverages cyber attacks for economic gain, to forego the need to spend a lot of time and money on research and development, Iran possibly sees the benefit of such an approach. By stealing intellectual property from research institutions like major Universities, Iran could potentially gain an economic advantage, or even a military one, depending on the application of the data they are focusing on collecting.