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TechCrunch reports the Cambridge Analytica story may have just taken a turn for the worse with Chris Wylie, the whistle-blower responsible for these powerful allegations, stating the 50M number was merely a safe number to share with the media:

Giving evidence today, to a UK parliamentary select committee that’s investigating the use of disinformation in political campaigning, Wylie said: “The 50 million number is what the media has felt safest to report — because of the documentation that they can rely on — but my recollection is that it was substantially higher than that. So my own view is it was much more than 50M.

Somehow I am unsurprised the number will ultimately turn out to be much larger than Facebook is willing to admit. The company is in damage control, especially after having lost $60B in value since the shocking revelations were unveiled almost ten days ago.

Facebook has previously confirmed 270,000 people downloaded Kogan’s app — a data harvesting route which, thanks to the lax structure of Facebook’s APIs at the time, enabled the foreign political consultancy firm to acquire information on more than 50 million Facebook users, according to the Observer, the vast majority of whom would have had no idea their data had been passed to CA because they were never personally asked to consent to it.

Instead, their friends were ‘consenting’ on their behalf — likely also without realizing.

In my own anecdotal testing, I have while most people are conscious that Facebook is not necessarily to be trusted, they never thought these applications operated the way they do. That is to say, nobody I have spoken with understood their friends, or their friends-of-friends data would be shared with third-party applications they interacted with on Facebook. That these applications knowingly surveilling Facebook accounts is complete news to most of the people I talked to.

This whole story keeps getting worse as the days pass. I wonder how long it will take, and what else will be revealed, before it his rock bottom.

After reading a story of a man who seduced the United States Navy’s Seventh Fleet I cannot help but feel this is unsurprising:

The target was not a terrorist, nor a spy for a foreign power, nor the kingpin of a drug cartel. But rather a 350-pound defense contractor nicknamed Fat Leonard, who had befriended a generation of Navy leaders with cigars and liquor whenever they made port calls in Asia.

Leonard Glenn Francis was legendary on the high seas for his charm and his appetite for excess. For years, the Singapore-based businessman had showered Navy officers with gifts, epicurean dinners, prostitutes and, if necessary, cash bribes so they would look the other way while he swindled the Navy to refuel and resupply its ships.

The downfall of the mighty United States military will not come about because of another major military player, but sadly, by imploding due to an entitlement and “look the other way” culture.